Kids In Vancouver: 5 Stroll-Worthy Seawalls In The City

Coal Harbour Seawall | Photo: Alexis Burkill (Flickr)

Coal Harbour Seawall | Photo: Alexis Burkill (Flickr)

Vancouver is rich with walking paths that weave along the city’s waterfront, but many seawall strolls are kilometres long, often too far for little feet to trek. Here are 5 seawall walks that are perfect to tackle with toddlers in tow, and each one has a fun destination at the end of the path, to keep the kids in motion while the adults enjoy the views along the way.

View from Olympic Village | Photo: Thomas Bullock (Flickr)

View from Olympic Village | Photo: Thomas Bullock (Flickr)

Olympic Village Seawall

This is a short jaunt, but the breathtaking views and array of activities along the way make it an enjoyable one. Start in the centre of Olympic Village where you can grab a coffee and a treat at Terra Breads, or feast on lunch on the waterfront patio of Tap & Barrel. Gaze at the giant bird statues that stand in the centre of the village, and be sure to snap a photo of the gorgeous view before you begin your stroll around the bend towards Science World.

Tip: When you arrive at Science World, be sure to extend your stroll along the TD Environmental Trail that surrounds the perimeter of the dome. This is a free exhibit where families can explore local issues of sustainability through engaging art pieces.

Stanley Park Seawall | Photo: James Wheeler (Flickr)

Stanley Park Seawall | Photo: James Wheeler (Flickr)

Stanley Park Seawall

The Stanley Park seawall is one of Vancouver’s most famous outdoor destinations, loved by cyclists, joggers, and casual walkers. While the full trek around Stanley Park is approximately 30 kilometres, there are many shorter stretches fit for smaller strolls. Families love to stroll and play along the shores of Second Beach, home to one of Vancouver’s favourite outdoor pools, and a large, fun-filled playground which features a real-life fire truck for kids to climb and explore.

Tip: Bring a bag of breadcrumbs and pop across the street to Lost Lagoon where you can explore the trails and feed the ducks. They love visitors.

Seaside Village | Photo: Bianca Bujan

Sea Village, Granville Island | Photo: Bianca Bujan

Granville Island Seawall

The Granville Island Seawall is a personal favourite, sprinkled with hidden gems along the way. Start in the heart of Granville Island, and head towards the water, where you can take the scenic route along the seawall towards Ron Brassford Park. Around the bend, you’ll find the floating homes of Granville Island, located in the cozy community of Sea Village.

Tip: When you reach the end of the seawall, turn left towards the centre of Granville Island. There you’ll find a quaint little alley, Railspur District, which is filled with art exhibits, coffee shops, and a petite playground.

South False Creek Seawall | Photo: Bianca Bujan

South False Creek Seawall | Photo: Bianca Bujan

South False Creek Seawall

Begin your walk at the entrance to Granville Island, and take the paved path to the seawall. Continue your stroll along the water and around the bend to Charleston park and the False Creek Elementary School playground. This is a great spot to picnic, run and play.

Tip: Look for the hidden waterfall located at the rear (inland) of Charleston Park, a fun spot to splash on warmer days.

Coal Harbour Seawall | Photo: Patrick Lundgren (Flickr)

Coal Harbour Seawall | Photo: Patrick Lundgren (Flickr)

Coal Harbour Seawall

Begin your jaunt at Harbour Green Park, where you can watch the water features and enjoy a treat at the bistro. Continue along the waterfront towards Canada Place, and you’ll come across the docks of Harbour Air, where you can watch seaplanes take off and land before your eyes.

Tip: Be sure to pop up the street and snap a photo with Vancouver’s Olympic cauldron, commemorating the 2010 Winter Olympics. 

 

Inside Vancouver Blog

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Kids In Vancouver: 5 Stroll-Worthy Seawalls In The City

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